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Beautiful recent wedding shots at the resort - thanks for sharing Truth & Tales! ... See MoreSee Less

Romance is definitely still alive & well with these two! Congratulations Krista & Denver. A few stolen moments during the reception, a wonderful way to close out our couples session.

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It's #NationalWineDay! Here are a few of our favourites... What are some of yours? ... See MoreSee Less

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We've got some hungry guests at the resort this morning! ... See MoreSee Less

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Our spa is now taking bookings for May 26th... ... See MoreSee Less

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What a beauty weekend and another amazing few days in the forecast! How are you enjoying our spectacular Canadian weather? ... See MoreSee Less

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Even in this beauty weather, we haven't forgotten about our skiers! New equipment is arriving for next season... ... See MoreSee Less

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Get your tickets today! ... See MoreSee Less

Cheese Boutique's Afrim Pristine & @TheChaseTThe Chase Toronto's Chef Michael Steh are taking over @hocHockley Valley Resort's Cabin Restaurant June 17! A 5-course tasting menu & Samuel Adams beer awaits! CALL TO BOOK: 1(800)HOCKLEY INFO:http://ow.ly/I6fL300p7Og

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Did we mention that Pizza in the Garden starts this weekend? It's definitely gonna be a Mmmm-may long weekend ;) ... See MoreSee Less

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How do we keep our course in tip top shape? This has something to do with it... (Thanks to Zander Sod Co Ltd and Podolinsky Equipment LTD.) ... See MoreSee Less

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It's #NationalCaesarDay, so celebrate in style! ... See MoreSee Less

6 days ago

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Are you ready? Pizza in the Garden is back this weekend! ... See MoreSee Less

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We've got an Exclusive Friday Deal you don't want to miss! Head to the Exclusive Deals tab on our page for details... ... See MoreSee Less

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How's the course looking? See for yourself! #nofilter ... See MoreSee Less

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Wow, this might be the best patio day so far! Come join us... ... See MoreSee Less

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And the garlic harvesting continues - check out these beauties! ... See MoreSee Less

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Lots going on at the resort... The magic carpet has been delivered for ski! Now to put it together... ... See MoreSee Less

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It's #meatlessmonday! Why not celebrate with your favourite greens and your favourite wine? ... See MoreSee Less

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We're planting strawberries! Have you started planting yet? ... See MoreSee Less

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Farm to Table: How To Get It Right

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Farm to table is a movement that’s been growing in recent years, from restaurants to grocery stores to your dining room table. Many of us are prioritizing what our families put in their mouths and learning what it means to be more conscious about where our food comes from. So how do you put a farm-to-table philosophy into practice? Here are our suggestions on how to get started:

1. Home Grown. One of the best ways to know where your produce comes from is to grow it yourself! If you’re not a natural green thumb, not to worry, there are tons of home gardening books and blogs for your reference. You don’t need a lot of space, either; build a raised garden, grow herbs in your kitchen or plant a fruit tree – a little goes a long way.

2. ‘Tis the Season. When buying your produce, try to shop mostly in season. This decreases the chance of an early pick, a long trip and chemicals to keep it fresh longer than is natural – not to mention a smaller carbon footprint. This is a great way to feed your family fresher produce, as well as offering a seasonal variety you might not otherwise try.

3. Get Local. Support farmers and vendors by staying local – not only does this maximize freshness, but getting your meat and produce from a farmer’s market means that you can talk to the growers themselves. Find out their philosophy, get an education on the process and help your local economy. Everybody wins!

Want to ease in slowly? How about receiving organic boxed produce right to your door on a weekly basis? Lots of companies are now offering this service, check your local listings for a company near you!

Are you drooling at the thought of fresh, gourmet meals? Visit us in cabin! For more information, visit our website here: http://www.hockley.com/eat/#cabin

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Organic Gardening: Fruits and Veggies 101

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If you’ve decided to give organic gardening a go this year, start off by planting some sure-fire, low maintenance picks… Here’s a list of just some of the many easy crops you can pick and some hints for a successful start:

Beans: A great choice because they are tasty fresh or frozen, and there so are many varieties available. Do some research, though, because you may require a trellis…

Blackberries: They can grow almost anywhere you have the space and they are very low maintenance. When picking, beware of the thorns, wear thick gloves or try a thornless variety.

Carrots: They are easy to plant from seed, and you know they are ready to pick when the tops are visible above the soil. They tend to be a hit with kids, too.

Cucumbers: Be sure to plant them after the last frost has passed or you will lose your crop. Cucumbers like to spread out, so give ‘em some room!

Lettuce: It’s super easy to plant and can tolerate partial shade. Plus, if you plant it in stages, you can have fresh salad all season.

Peppers: There are lots of types you can choose from, but the bell pepper plant is generally found to be the easiest to grow.

Rhubarb: A very hardy and versatile choice, it can be grown in a sunny spot or in partial shade. It can also be frozen easily so you can dine on delicious rhubarb pie all year long.

Raspberries: They are a late producing fruit, so planting raspberries will allow you to enjoy freshly harvested fruit into the fall. Plant them in a sunny, dry area for best results.

Squash: Generally squash is found to be easier to grow from the plant (rather than from seed) and it doesn’t like the wind, so position it carefully.

Strawberries: They can be grown in the garden, containers, window boxes or hanging baskets, and they are delicious picked fresh!

Stay tuned for the next series post, Organic Gardening: Pests!

Organic gardening is important to us too. Our 4-acre organic garden is a testament to our farm-to-table philosophy, providing 80% of all menu ingredients (offering house-made pickles and preserves in the winter). Enjoy an amazing culinary experience at cabin, Babbo or 85 today!

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Organic Gardening: Keeping Pests Out!

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We know organic gardening brings fresh, pesticide-free produce and a healthier diet, but how do you save your bounty from hungry local wildlife? Here is a list of some of the more common garden pests and some time-tested tricks to help keep them out of your garden:

  1. Insects: Got aphids? Consider attracting their predator, the lady bug (typically drawn to Queen Anne’s Lace, dill and fennel) who will eat up all those aphids. For mosquitos, try planting citronella, ageratum or catnip to keep them away. As a general tip, marigolds can be used to combat beetles, squash bugs, tomato hornworms and whiteflies – making them a great choice as an overall bug deterrent in your garden.

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